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Common Name:
Mexican Blonde Tarantula
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Common Name:  Mexican Blonde Tarantula

Other Common Names:  Tucson Blonde Tarantula, Mexican Blond, Desert Blonde, Arizona Blonde

Scientific Name:  Aphonopelma chalcodes  (Full Taxonomy)

Group:  

Origin or Range:  Arizona

Relative Size:  Larger Than Average  
    (as compared to other tarantulas)

Average Lifespan:  20 year(s)

Compatibility:  Relatively Non-Aggressive   
    (as compared to other tarantulas)

Category:  Arachnids » Tarantulas
Animal Description:  

The Mexican Blonde Tarantula is a truly impressive spider. Even people with spider phobias have been known to comment on the beauty and majesty of these creatures!

Mexican Blonde Tarantulas live in burrows that they dig straight down into the ground. Despite the difficulty of hard, dry, gravelly desert soil, the Mexican Blonde Tarantula can dig a burrow of about two feet in depth! Generally, they will spin a silk mesh covering over their burrows. In fact, during the colder months they may cover up the entrances of their burrows for up to six months. Their metabolisms are so slow that the Mexican Blonde Tarantula survives this period of isolation easily. Some can go for up to two years without eating! In captivity, the Mexican Blonde Tarantula may be a bit shy or skittish but is quite docile once it is used to its surroundings. It can easily be kept in a desert terrarium and will eat large crickets or grasshoppers. You should provide fresh water for your Mexican Blonde Tarantula at all times. Females have been known to live for more than 20 years.

Mexican Blonde Tarantulas are quite beautiful. Their prickly hairs are not particularly irritating to human skin. The back of the tarantula is covered with tan or blonde hair that has a faint shimmer. The rest of the Mexican Blonde Tarantula has brownish hair with red highlights, and the legs are a distinctive bronzed color. Mexican Blonde Tarantulas can grow to between two and a half to six inches and have stocky body types. They can store fat in their abdomens, allowing them to fast for long periods.

Also known as the Desert Blonde or Tucson Blonde Tarantula, these spiders are not uncommonly kept as pets! They are native to the Sonoran Desert, which ranges from northern Mexico into the southern part of the United States. The burrow of the Mexican Blonde Tarantula is identified by its round opening and straight tunnel covered by silk. These animals aid humans by controlling insect populations.

Specific Care Information: Relative Care Ease: Relatively Easy

When keeping a Mexican Blonde Tarantula, have a deep layer of substrate for it. The enclosure where you keep this tarantula should be about as high as the animal's outstretched legs.

Breeding and Propagation: Relative Breeding Ease: Difficult

It is quite difficult to breed the Mexican Blonde Tarantula in captivity. This may be because breeding is possibly cued by light or temperature changes not present in a captive environment. Mexican Blonde Tarantulas are usually mature at nine or ten years of age.

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Friday, 24 October 2014